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Provisioning Hardware and Media for the WAN

   

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Provisioning Hardware and Media for the WAN

  

 

WAN Design Considerations

  

 

Extending into the WAN

  

 

Selecting Cisco Hardware for Small- to Medium-Sized Networks

  

 

Provisioning Interface Description Blocks on Cisco Routers

  

 

Router Switching Modes

  

 

Choosing a Router Platform

  

 

Provisioning WANs

  

 

Summary

  

 

Case Studies

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Designing Cisco Networks

From: Designing Cisco Networks
Author: Diane Teare
Publisher: Cisco Press (53)
More Information

7. Provisioning Hardware and Media for the WAN

You will need approximately three hours to complete this chapter and its exercises. Upon completion of this third chapter in Part IV, you will be able to do the following:

  • Recognize scalability constraints and issues for standard WAN technologies.

  • Recognize scalability constraints and performance budgets for major Cisco products.

  • Recommend Cisco products and WAN technologies that will meet the customer's requirements for performance, capacity, and scalability in an enterprise network.

This chapter includes some tables and other job aids that you will find useful when completing the case studies at the end of the chapter. References to some Web sites are also included; relevant information has been extracted from these sites and is provided in the chapter. If you have access to the Internet, you might want to access the sites mentioned to obtain detailed information related to specific topics. All the sites referenced in this chapter are also listed in Appendix C, “Interesting WWW Links and Other Suggested Readings.”

The Cisco Product Selection Tool, available on Cisco's Web site, is also referenced in the case studies at the end of this chapter. An introduction to the tool is provided in Chapter 6, “Provisioning Hardware and Media for the LAN,” and you are encouraged to try the tool if you have access to the Internet.

Follow these steps to complete this chapter:

  1. Study the chapter content, including any tables and job aids that appear in the reading assignment.

  2. Review the case studies at the end of this chapter.

  3. Complete the questions in each case study.

  4. Review the answers provided by our internetworking experts in Appendix B, “Answers to Chapter Questions, Case Studies, and Sample CCDA Exam.”

Provisioning WAN media and hardware involves making many decisions, including which devices to use and what type of WAN to use to interconnect these devices. This chapter discusses these issues in the following sections:

  • WAN Design Considerations

  • Extending into the WAN

  • Selecting Cisco Hardware for Small- to Medium-Sized Networks

  • Provisioning Interface Description Blocks on Cisco Routers

  • Router Switching Modes

  • Choosing a Router Platform

  • Provisioning WANs

WAN Design Considerations

WAN designs should provide reliable service, minimize the cost of bandwidth, and optimize bandwidth efficiency. In Figure 7-1, for example, you would want to minimize the cost of bandwidth and optimize bandwidth efficiency between the corporate office and remote offices.

Figure 7-1. WANs Are Used Between Corporate and Remote Offices

To provide reliable services for end-user applications in a cost-effective and efficient manner, you should select the right type of WAN technology. The following sections review some common WAN technologies and their typical applications.

Analog Modems

Analog modems, which operate over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), are used in the following applications:

  • By telecommuters and mobile users who access the network fewer than two hours per day

  • As a backup for another type of link

Figure 7-2 shows analog modems in use over the PSTN.

Figure 7-2. Analog Modems Are Used Over the Public Switched Telephone Network

Leased Lines

Leased lines, shown in Figure 7-3, are used in the following applications:

  • In point-to-point networks and hub-and-spoke topologies

  • As a backup for another type of link

Figure 7-3. Leased Lines Can Be Used for Point-to-Point Networks

ISDN

ISDN, shown in Figure 7-4, is used in the following applications:

  • For cost-effective remote access to corporate networks for telecommuters and remote offices

  • As support for voice and video

  • As a backup for another type of link

Figure 7-4. ISDN Is Used by Telecommuters to Access the Corporate Network

Frame Relay

Frame Relay, shown in Figure 7-5, is used in the following applications:

  • For cost-effective, high-speed, low-latency mesh or hub-and-spoke topology between remote sites

  • For both private and carrier-provided networks

Figure 7-5. Frame Relay Provides a Cost-Effective, High-Speed Connection Between Remote Offices

X.25

X.25, shown in Figure 7-6, is used in the following applications:

  • As a reliable WAN circuit or backbone

  • As support for legacy applications

Figure 7-6. X.25 Provides a Reliable WAN Backbone

ATM

ATM, shown in Figure 7-7, is used in the following applications:

  • As support for accelerating bandwidth requirements

  • As support for multiple Quality of Service (QoS) classes for differing application requirements for delay and loss

Figure 7-7. ATM Provides a High Bandwidth Core Layer
   

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